'ALL AMERICAN' WAS STOLEN FROM A BLACK ACTOR & INDEPENDENT PRODUCER!!!!

#CANCELALLAMERICAN

All American

All American is straight cap'. Blake Jenkins (Spencer James) is a socially, politically, and culturally conscious Black American football star from an inner-city called Hush Mouth City.  Before he turned 11 years old, Blake's father abandoned him, moving away to start a new family with a white woman, and his mother died in a car accident. Blake is a math whiz who majors in Public Service & Community Affairs. His bootstrap "American Dream" is to become a pro-football player, so he can save his family from poverty and ultimately dismantle the negative constraints of being held back on account of race. After years of hard work and dedication, Blake earns a scholarship to a D1 University in Los Angeles, California. We learn of extreme poverty and gentrification.  And there was a shooting, "when a couple of guys who were up to no good, started making trouble in my neighborhood", murdering his cousin and hospitalizing his brother. Theoretically, his "life got flipped, turned upside down". Blake had to leave his family behind and not refuse the call of destiny. When he first arrived at school, he instantly noticed that the students looked like trust fund babies.  It's clear that he's stepped into a world of wealth/privilege and came from a completely different background. The new reality in Los Angeles is not a cake walk because Blake has to deal with racism on all levels while maintaining an authentic connection to his ordinary world and family.

Almost instantly, while in Los Angeles, Blake bumps heads with Derek (Asher), the racist teammate that plays the same position. Derek is jealous of Blake's talent, and he's always trying to sabotage him on and off the field. Blake makes inroads with (1). John (Asher), the rich, All-American Frat who actually has a poor person's background; (2). Alex (Jordan), the racially unconscious, half-black/half-white, best friend; and (3). Sabrina (Layla), the loner who was initially used by Derek to "set him up", but ultimately becomes Blake's love interest. Even with a better life in front of him, Blake constantly "bounces between both worlds". Throughout his journey, Blake faces obstacles like being "set up" to having a white girl accuse him of rape in Los Angeles. He also faces peer pressure, being seduced into the Hush Mouth City street life when Petey Da Prince (Coop), his childhood rival and wannabe rapper, almost convinces him to join the Bloods gang. Nevertheless, Blake overcomes unbearable obstacles, wins the NCAA Championship game, and then brings his family, friends, and enemies closer to deliver a speech about obtaining Tunnel Vision despite all odds.

This is just one way to summarize a 15 Minute Short Film Presentation and more than 200 pages of literate work. Simply put, my copyright materials were stolen, and modified by hired writers on the television series: All American (2017). The summary of Blake's character is just the tip of this plagiarized enterprise. While ideas may be far and vast, there's only room for one true expression.

All American

"My Short Film Presentation Convinced Greg Berlanti, CBS Studios, and Warner Bros. Television to "Green-light" 'All American' for a Series Pick Up on The CW Network"

#CANCELALLAMERICAN

Pay close attention to the relationships and the overall expression. Note that the "central conflict" in this Short Film Presentation arose from Blake's jealous white teammate who "set him up" as part of a racially based act to "get rid of him". That's a reoccurring plot found in each of my copyrights.

FIRST PUBLICATION

On June 1st, 2017, a Trailer for the Short Film was released on Ricketts’ Shawn Turner Facebook Fan Page using self-created, “laser-targeted” audience campaigns. Amongst the specifically targeted Hollywood Type (“competitor audience”): (location) United Kingdom: London (+25 mi) England, United States: Apple Valley (+25 mi), Los Angeles (+25 mi), San Francisco (+25 mi) California; Miami (+25 mi) Florida; Atlanta (+25 mi) Georgia; Chicago (+25 mi) Illinois; New York (+25 mi) New York; (age) 13 – 65+; (Interest) Empire (2015), African American or Black (Color); (must be interested in) Film producer, Hollywood, Film director, Filmmaking or The Hollywood Reporter; (must be interested in) Equal opportunity; (must be interested in) Film festival, Lee Daniels, Tyler Perry Studios, Independent film, Short film, Showtime (TV network), Streaming media, Oprah Winfrey, Entertainment, Netflix, Spike Lee, Hulu, Network (film) or 21st Century Fox, Employers: Sony Pictures Television, Lionsgate, 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures, HBO, William Morris Agency, Warner Bros. Entertainment, Warner Bros. Pictures, William Morris Endeavor, NBCUniversal, Creative Artists Agency, Paramount Pictures, Paramount Studios, Sony Pictures, Universal Studios Entertainment, United Talent Agency, FOX, BET or NBC.

On June 1st, 2017, a Trailer for the Short Film was released on Ricketts’ Shawn Turner, Facebook Fan Page using many self-created, “laser-targeted” audience campaigns. Amongst the specifically targeted African American Gravitation (“consumer audience”): (lives in) United States; (language) English (UK) or English (US); (age) 13-65+; (must be interested in) Short film, Film producer, Drama movies, Actor or Black (Color), comedy movies or comedy; (must be interested in) Denzel Washington, Eddie Griffin, Eddie Murphy, Keenen Ivory Wayans, Katt Williams, Martin Lawrence, Dave Chappelle, Steve Harvey, Mike Epps, D. L. Hughley, Kevin Hart, The Wayans Bros., Shawn Wayans, Tyler Perry, Chris Tucker, Charlie Murphy, Marlon Wayans or Cedric the Entertainer, African American Studies, Empire (2015), Love and Hip Hop, Drama movies or Comedy-Drama, Power (2014), Lee Daniels, Michael B. Jordan, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Kevin Hart, Oprah 20 Winfrey, Fox, Straight Outta Compton or Friday (1995 film); (must be interested in) Internet meme, BuzzFeed or Funny or Die; (must also be interested in) football.

FILM FESTIVAL CIRCUIT

Ricketts’ Short Film Presentation is a condensed artwork version of MORE THAN 200 PAGES OF LITERATE WORK, June 2017, by way of 25+ submissions to film festivals, which includes, but is not limited to the African American Film Festival, Atlanta Film Festival and acceptances/premieres at the 2017 Indie Nights Film Festival (Chinese Theatre), 2017 International Black Film Festival (held in the United Kingdom - Daniel Ezra's hometown), and the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. Agents from ViacomCBS were at the premiere.

'All American' is NOT Based on Spencer Paysinger's Life Story!!! The Creative Elements Were STOLEN YEARS AGO!

Cooper Hood

“Although it retained Spencer’s need to play at Beverly High School, instead of his hometown school, All American changed his name to Spencer James and didn’t stop there. For the purposes of All American though, Spencer James has been an even more versatile player on the field – and he was NOT a State Champion. His skills as a receiver are what made him get noticed, but he also played a defensive back for Beverly in addition to handling some kickoff return duties. The biggest transition appears to be on the horizon as James was training for a move to running back at the end of Season 2. Spencer’s father was not absent. Spencer was not shot in high school.”

Cooper Hood ScreenRant
Donat Ricketts

Throughout Paysinger’s high school career, he only went to one school: Beverly Hills High School. Even though he lived in South Central Los Angeles, he would travel to Beverly Hills every day for school. He graduated from Beverly in 2006 after playing at least two seasons as a Beverly Hills Norman. But, All American has added a changing nature to what school Spencer attends. The show introduces audiences to Spencer James as he’s playing for South Crenshaw High School, but he soon winds up playing his junior year at Beverly Hills. After winning the state title, though, All American ends Season 2 with James pledging to play for Crenshaw again next season. This never happened for Paysinger, which will make the transition to Crenshaw in Season 3 of the series “all the more unrelated to his actual life story”.  All American changed where Spencer played football–this is my creative element of “telling the tale of an aspiring football star bouncing between both worlds”. Those folks hired black writers to stretch my expression for the television medium. Also, Spencer was NOT popular in NFL. He was drafted as a free agent in 2011, traded more times than J.T. O’Sullivan until late 2017. Spencer Paysinger knew he was getting booted out the NFL after being benched, and playing only three [sorry] games with the Panthers in December 2017. Had those white folks claimed that All American was “based on” someone like ex-NFL player Michael Vick, Cameron Newton, Russell Wilson, or Colin Kaepernick, their claim of origination would have merit. Spencer Paysinger claims that All American was started by “conversations on a couch” in late 2016, which led to a network of openly gay white producers who seemingly brokered a business deal(s) on their “personal time”–everyone in Hollywood know what that means!

Donat Ricketts Abiff Productions, LLC
Sydni Ingram

All American tells the audience that the only way to succeed in life if you grow up in a neighborhood that is not affluent is to somehow become “lucky” enough that someone in the rich neighborhood will ask you to live with him and play football at the rich kids’ school.

Sydni Ingram Dig Mag
Megan Vick

From the very beginning, All American hasn’t been afraid to start important conversations. In the series’ third episode, “i,” Spencer and his football teammate Jordan get pulled over while driving a fancy convertible. Jordan, who’s biracial and has never dealt with the police before, mouths off at the officers’ lack of cause for pulling them over. When he and Spencer are forcibly detained, Jordan gets a rude awakening about the America he thought he lived in and the reality of his life as a man of color. The scene set a benchmark for the places that All American would go while telling the story of a promising high school athlete trying to make a better life for himself and his family. Spencer, Jordan, and co-stars Olivia, Asher, Layla, and Coop revisited some of the standout moments from The CW drama’s first two seasons — including Spencer and Jordan’s brush with police — as part of TV Guide’s 100 Best Shows ranking. 

Megan Vick TV Guide
Sydni Ingram

Overall, “All American” is more than boys playing football; it’s a show with a predominantly black cast that talks about problems related to the black community. “All American” is not afraid to start conversations that may be deemed “too controversial” for television.

Sydni Ingram Gid Mag

DANIEL EZRA'S MEANINGFUL TIES TO SPENCER JAMES

The most important scene in "i" wasn't Jordan and Spencer's confrontation with police, but the conversation Spencer has with Jordan's father, Billy, afterward. "The kind of buzzy thing is the police stuff, but I think the conversation is so important because Billy genuinely thought that his fame and living in Beverly Hills and the fact that his kids were biracial, he thought that he could escape the issues of being Black in America. And I think him realizing that he couldn't, and him realizing that this is something he's going to have to address as a father, for me that's the most vital moment of the episode.

Daniel Ezra
Daniel Ezra TV Guide
All American

CONSIDERING Daniel Ezra's background:

We THE PEOPLE say:

All American
ROAST ME!

Chhhiilllee - wurd on da curb is he tries to sound smarter than errrbody else - Daniel Ezra is NOT a Black American! He's a Nigerian from Birmingham, United Kingdom, far from Sweet Home Alabama. While Ezra grew up in the United Kingdom, Black American men were being murdered by the police and have suffered systemic racism, something far greater than having the pleasure of surviving police brutality in order to make it home for a fatherly conversation. Therefore, Ezra is clearly unable to connect with the "benchmark" of the entire Series. Even White Americans knew that the issue of Spencer and Jordan dealing with the police set the benchmark for All American, not the inquiry of Taye Diggs' life story.

Upon all information and belief, Leah Daniels Butler Casting knew at least 20 African American actors who could have portrayed Spencer. Yet, the white Network/Studio executives went out of their way to hire a Black British actor, paid for expensive flight(s), apartment, work permit, and told him to hide his access until the Pilot wrapped. All of this was to propagate a white narrative of what would appear to be real life issues based on Black Culture.

IT IS SO ORDERED. Signed American Descendants of Slavery (Gag Order).

Hence had not the incident involving the police, the conversation between Taye Diggs and Spencer, premised on the idea of a self-hating Black man would not have transpired. Furthermore, isn't the tagline for All American, Season 3: "Never Forget Where You From"?

WE THE PEOPLE SENTENCE Daniel Ezra to (1). Go fix your teeth; (2). Learn how to play "American Football"; and (3). BOI, STOP PLAYING WITH AMERICAN DESCENDANTS OF SLAVERY!!!!!

#Depolarized #CancelAllAmerican #BoycottAllAmerican 

ALL AMERICAN'S SHOW RUNNER CANNOT TELL AN AUTHENTIC AFRICAN AMERICAN STORY (De Facto)!

#CANCELALLAMERICAN

After Ricketts complained to Hollywood Executives, April Blair, the white women who claims to have "Created" All American stepped down as Show Runner. April Blair was immediately replaced with Nkechi Okoro Carroll, a first generation Nigerian American. Nkechi Okoro Carroll is NOT a Black American descendant of persons enslaved in the United States. Therefore, she took part in a conspiracy to prevent Ricketts from gaining African American allies who have inside knowledge and dealings in Hollywood.

Nkechi Okoro Carroll

Carroll was born in New York, but lived in many places while growing up, including Nigeria, Côte d’Ivoire, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Her parents are Nigerian and came to the United States for college but decided to stay. Her dad was a lawyer, and when Carroll was four years old, her family moved to Nigeria for her father’s job. When she was eight, Carroll’s parents split, and she moved with her mom to Côte d’Ivoire near her cousins. When she was living in Africa, she watched a lot of television, which shaped her view of the US. From the time she was young, she wanted to be a writer. Carroll was later sent to boarding school in Oxford, England and began performing at the Oxford Youth Theater.

Nkechi Okoro Carroll Nkechi Okoro Carroll, LLC

All AmericanRicketts is an actor, independent producer, content creator, and activist. Between 2013-2015, Ricketts participated in paid networking events to pitch his content to executives, casting directors, and producers within the CBS Universe in search of contracting opportunity. He worked as an actor on several major Network television shows, independent films and has won several awards while reaching a targeted audience of consumers, producers, investors and distributors when he marketed and promoted two (of four) Presentations related to his football franchise entitled: Blake’s World and/or alternatively Tunnel Vision in 2015 and 2017.

In 2012, Ricketts created a title character, Blake Jenkins (“Blake”) and the expression premised on a coming-of-age Black American football star who is socially, politically, and racially conscious (reverse engineering). From 2013 through mid-2017, Ricketts developed his materials with a topical, “keeping it real” attitude while building a visual and insightful journey for his biological nephew.  He is a young football star from the “hood” whose father “abandoned him” and mother died in a car accident. Ricketts sought to influence “judgement free” diversity in the CBS Universe by exemplifying “how to” truly identify with and encourage young Black Americans, as Blake achieves his dreams (“Failure Is Not an Option”) at all cost by gaining a special insight of his talent (“Football”), and thus the world itself (“Tunnel Vision”).

In 2013, the Black Lives Matter organization was created by a select group of Black American women who set forth a Global mission to bring justice, freedom and healing to Black people across the globe as a response to the acquittal of young Trayvon Martin’s (“Martin”) murderer. Martin is Ricketts’ second cousin, and both are from the State of Florida. Ricketts copyrights were innovative as “Black Lives Matter” elements were not syndicated in the television medium prior to Fox’s Empire (2015).

Ricketts concedes that the Defendants, specifically CBS Corporation (prior to merger), and the CW Network were not in the business of Broadcasting artwork premised on race, class, or the inequality of Black Americans in a dramatic expression. Ricketts concedes that the Defendants had direct access to his copyrighted materials and used it to develop a television series. Ricketts further concedes, to the extent that the Defendants had direct access and used his materials, according to the common “do it yourself” industry practices, and “jargon”, he was and remains entitled to a: 1.) Literary Options Deal, 2.) First-Look Deal, 3.) Talent Holding Deal, as well as an 4.) Overall Deal (collectively “Vanity Shingles Deal”) backed by the financial/cultural interest of his authorship.

Ricketts concedes that customary to standard practices of “red taping”, and based on Spencer Paysinger’s words of "everything starting from conversations on a couch", he “may” have engaged in sexual favors with Dane Morck, Robbie Rogers, and Greg Berlanti prior to hiring April Blair and conducting an alleged Pitch Meeting with Warner Bros. Television. Together they colluded to “rip off” Ricketts' materials(s), and backed him into an inevitable dream situation by using his creative expressiontitle characteridea(s)business module, and the selection & arrangement of ideals premised on "Black Culture" found in his copyrights.

Ricketts concedes that Rogers, Berlanti, and Makenna Productions are “non-creative” producers with a well-known track record for creating television shows and feature films “based on” pre-existing copyrights. Ricketts concedes that customary to Makenna Productions’ well-known track record, his copyrighted materials were used to “quickly” create artwork by mixing it with scenes-a-faire found in many shows on The CW Network. They changed his inner-city gangsta character(s) into a lesbian, and used verbatim dialog. For these thieves to claim that All American is "loosely based on" Spencer Paysinger's Life Story is part of a scheme to wholly disregard black ownership/control of the expression in question, which rightfully belongs to Ricketts.

April Blair is a white citizen credited as the “Creator” of All American, but she publicly acknowledged that she had no clue about such expression premised on Black American Culture. Ricketts' copyrights were “ripped-off” based on well-known systemic racism, and socioeconomic discrimination practices against Black American men  but for a “cultural disadvantage”, a "corporate synergy" and the “economic advantages” to white executives and their foreign enterprise(s).

Rob Hardy, a Black American male, also collected portions of Ricketts' copyrighted materials and then used them to help April Blair script doctor the Pilot Script sometime in August 2017.

In early October 2018, Ricketts sent an email to more than 150 executives in Hollywood, claiming theft of his intellectual property, because he didn't know who to blame. April Blair then "stepped down" as Show Runner for All American. She was replaced with Nkechi Okoro Carroll ("Carroll"), a Nigerian woman. It's a safe bet that Carroll is simply fulfilling her contractual duties to Warner Bros. Television. She had NO dealings with the development/creation of All American. She did not come into the picture prior to the series being "green-lit". However, during the 2020 Paley Festival, she stated something like, "we wouldn't be here if it wasn't for Spencer Paysinger". But, she doesn't have any personal knowledge of that! Additionally, it's clear that she was strategically shuffled in to become the Show Runner to hinder Ricketts' chance of gaining Black American Women as allies.

PROTECT BLACK AMERICAN ARTIST IN HOLLYWOOD

#CANCELALLAMERICAN

All American
Whitney Davis

The company has a white problem across the board. Did you know that there’s not one black creative executive working at CBS Television Network or CBS Television Studios? Of the network’s 36 creative executives — all upper management roles that deal with content development, casting, current production, daytime and alternative programming — there are only three women of color, none black. There is not one executive of color working in casting at CBS. The one Latinx executive hired in casting last year lasted eight months. He works at Netflix now.

Whitney Davis, ViacomCBS
Jason Lee

There are not Black People at the top of Viacom managing the puppets that they hire on its cast. I've been a puppet for that Network, and I no longer want to be.

Jason Lee, Black Enterprise

All American

2 YEARS LATER, SPENCER PAYSINGER CALLS HIMSELF THE "CREATOR" OF 'ALL AMERICAN' AND "HOPES" THAT HE GETS HIRED ON AS A RECURRING ACTOR

#CANCELALLAMERICAN

Remember, Spencer Paysinger first admitted that he had minimum involvement with the development/creation of 'All American'. Indisputably Rob Hardy helped April Blair with the Pilot Script. But, from an alleged Life Rights Agreement to a Consultant Agreement and then a Co-Producer Agreement, Spencer Paysinger has been coached about the "One-page Pitch", and claims he "CREATED" 'All American' in the same year as Ricketts. He's also  zealous about being hired on the Series as an actor. Spencer Paysinger appears to be drunk off the benefits/perks of being affiliated with a Series he did NOT create nor does he own.

RICKETTS' COPYRIGHT(S) V. ALL AMERICAN

Ideas found in All American that should be ignored.

  • Rich characters dealing with drug/alcohol addictions, partying and “high school drama” was done in The O.C. (2003);
  • A fatherly football coach and his relationship with his wife and kids was done in Friday Night Lights (2006);
  • Bre-Z portraying Coop as a drug-dealer, a rapper and lesbian. She’s played by the same actress who portrayed an identical character on 31-episodes of Empire (2015);
  • Inner-city characters “snitching” on each other for power, clout, money, in-and-out-of-jail was done in The Wire (2002), Power (2014) and Empire (2015);
  • Olivia Baker starting her own popular radio talk show or podcast is a signature element extracted from Dear White People (2017);
  • A poor African American boy adopted by a Beverly Hills family was done in 90210 (2008);
  • Football coach as the father of the African American star player was done in Riverdale (2017); and
  • African American lesbians advocating for “Black Lives Matter” was done in The Black Lightning (2018).

OVERALL EXPRESSION

Ricketts' “Blue-Print” sets forth a sports program about race and to feature a predominately African American cast with its story being told through an African American lead, specifically a poor boy who’s trying to figure out how to make it in a “white mans’ world” – driving by “hot news” as it relates to today’s modern world, it’s cause and effect on society – expressed through a transcending star football players’ journey, dream of stardom to achieve “Tunnel Vision” by way of mastering football and thus life itself. (See Executive Summary; Treatment.) Additionally, Blake’s torn between his dream and his hometown. (See Treatment; and Movie Script.)

The Series is largely recognizable as the CW Networks’ first sports drama about race and to feature a predominately African American cast with the story being told through an African American lead with a complex background, specifically a poor boy who’s trying to figure out how to make it in a “white mans’ world” – driving by “hot news” as it relates to today’s modern world, it’s cause and effect on society - expressed through a transcending star football player who dreams of stardom. He agrees to move in with the football coach to attend Beverly High on an illegal transfer to secure a “back up plan” if football doesn’t work in his favor. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1.) Conclusively, Spencer’s torn between his dream and his hometown.

In Hush Mouth City, after a “neighborhood act of gun violence” Blake is left numb, and has to make a tough decision to leave Kenny, his brother, in a coma, or to continue on his journey and attend the football program in Los Angeles. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

In Crenshaw, after a “neighborhood act of gun violence” Spencer looks at the scene from afar. Suddenly, Billy Baker appears as the “white savior” (although he’s portrayed by an African American), expressing that the only way to succeed in life if you grow up in a neighborhood that is not affluent is to somehow become "lucky" enough that someone in the rich neighborhood will ask you to live with him and play football at the rich kids' school.” (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

In Hush Mouth City, after a “neighborhood act of gun violence” Blake is left numb, and has to make a tough decision to leave Kenny, his brother, in a coma, or to continue on his journey and attend the football program in Los Angeles. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

In Crenshaw, after a “neighborhood act of gun violence” Spencer looks at the scene from afar. Suddenly, Billy Baker appears as the “white savior” (although he’s portrayed by an African American), expressing that the only way to succeed in life if you grow up in a neighborhood that is not affluent is to somehow become "lucky" enough that someone in the rich neighborhood will ask you to live with him and play football at the rich kids' school.” (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake’s “Tunnel Vision” is expressed as his special ability – exposing his compassionate ties to the low class world (family, friends, community activities) in which he comes from, his righteous anger, to “read the team’s defense and see the filed better than anyone else”, and a philosophical approach to mastering the game of football and treating it as a cure to a traumatic life itself. (See Treatment.)

Spencer’s “Super Focus” is expressed as his special ability – exposing his somewhat-compassionate ties to the low class world (family, friends, community activities) in which he comes from, his righteous anger, and a philosophical approach to see the football filed better than anyone else while treating it with transparent focus and pure intentions. (See Spencer Script; and Season 1, Episode 1)

PLOT(S)

Reoccurring plot points premised on “football,” “family drama,” “constantly bouncing between the inner-city and the privileged world,” “racial injustice”, “police brutality,” “hometown”, “school setting,” “drug dealing,” “gang-banging,” “black-on-black crime,” “poverty”, “Tunnel Vision”, “not refusing the call of destiny”, “Public Service and Community Affairs (saving the inner city)”, “gentrification”, “healthcare coverage” and meaningful scene(s) in the “urban park”. (See All Copyrights.)

Reoccurring plot points premised on “football,” “family drama,” “constantly bouncing between the inner-city and the privileged world,” “racial injustice”, “police brutality,” “hometown”, “school setting,” “drug dealing,” “gang-banging,” “black-on-black crime,” “poverty”, “not refusing the call of destiny”, “Super Focus”, “Public Service and Community Affairs (saving the inner city)”, “gentrification”, “healthcare coverage” and meaningful scene(s) in the “urban park”. (See Spencer Script; entire Series.)

After leaving the Barbershop, Blake spots white investors “deep in the hood” inquiring about the purchase of black owned property (gentrification). (See Movie Script.) Blake would do anything to protect the “neighborhood park” as that is where most of his childhood memories lies and his college major is Public Service and Community Affairs. (See Executive Summary; and Blake’s World TV Script (cold opening).)

At an ice cream shop, the employee asks them to leave. The cops are called and they side with "white supremacy" - depicting people moving into black neighborhoods and not wanting to do business with them, nor serve the original people of the community (gentrification). (See Season 1, Episode 9.) Spencer attempted to take the “urban park” from the gang bangers. (See Season 1, Episode 10.) Additionally, Spencer sacrifices himself to save “Crenshaw High” from becoming a magnate school. (See Season 2, Episode 16.)

Each concrete plot is expressed through the Blake, an African American football star from the “hood”, and/or his relationships with major characters. Starts with a “neighbor act of gun violence” before he journeys into the Special World (“Los Angeles”) where “the kids look like trust fund babies”. (See All Copyrights.)

Each concrete plot is expressed through Spencer, an African American football star from the “hood”, and his relationships with major characters. Starts with a “neighbor act of gun violence” before he journeys into the Special World (“Beverly Hills”) where the kids at school have sushi days and wear expensive clothing. (See Spencer Script; and Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake navigates between the world of wealth and poverty whilst simultaneously telling stories in both worlds as he strives to become a football star in today’s modern, social, and political climate (created in 2013). (See Executive Summary.)

Spencer navigates between the world of wealth and poverty whilst simultaneously telling stories in both world as he strives to become a football star in today’s modern world (Broadcasted in 2018).

Blake’s aunt Joanne (a single black women) is behind in bills and has a gambling addiction. In comparison to Blake’s “at home” struggles, the kids in Los Angeles look like trust fund babies. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Spencer’s mother Autumn (a single black women) is behind in bills, she works for the LAPD and makes up a catchy phrase to supplement her lack of financial support. Spencer could not afford a laptop, nor a suit for a sports booster event, but the Beverly kids are rich. (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

After leaving the “barbershop”, there is a “block party” where “gang bangers” arrive to confront Rodney about a “robbery”, which leads to “black-on-black crime”. Rodney is shot dead while Kenny is “shot in the chest”. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Spencer’s caught in the middle of “black-on-black crime” during a “block party” that led to “gang bangers” committing a “robbery” and someone gets shot inside a “barbershop.” (See Season 2, Episode 5-6.) Spencer is later “shot in the chest”. (See Season 2, Episode 11.)

Blake has various obstacles premised on racism and stereotyping. Specifically, a student yells “stop and frisk that guy” when he first arrives at the school. (See Blake’s World: TV Script.) Additionally, his white teammate who plays the same position as he constantly plots against him. (See all Copyrights.) Blake does find himself temporarily seduced into a gang-related activity by Peter Da Prince after his life in Los Angeles crumbled. (See Treatment; and Movie Script.)

Spencer must deal with various acts of racism and stereotyping. Specifically, his white teammate who plays the same position as he asked him if he is associated with Crips or Bloods, referring to gangs and constantly plots against him. Spencer does find himself temporarily seduced into gang-related activities by Coop after his life in Beverly Hills crumbled. (See Season 2.)

Blake faces “police brutality”, “racial injustice”, and he is represented by a successful white female attorney after being falsely accused of rape. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.) Alex helps Blake. Additionally, “the cops dropped the charges because they were afraid of a lawsuit”. (See Presentation Film.)

Laura Baker is a successful white female attorney who straightens cops out” after they harassed and nearly assaulted Jordan and Spencer for “driving while black”. (See Season 1, Episode 3.). Laura Baker insists that the best way to obtain justice is to file a lawsuit.

Blake’s introduced to his allies (half-black-half-white best friend), enemies (racist football player(s)) and is tested by his ambiguous love interests (half-black-half-white). Derek sends Sabrina to “set him up”, which ultimately leads to false accusations of rape and Blake being removed from the football team – thereby eliminating competition. (See Movie Script.) Derek also directs other white teammates to sabotage Blake’s on field performance and later colludes with his own friends - to “haze” him at a Halloween party - causing a bad LSD trip and a three-game suspension. (See Treatment.)

Spencer’s introduced to his allies (half-black-half-white best friend), enemies (racist football player(s)) and is tested by his ambiguous love interests (half-black-half-white). Asher sends Leita Keating to “set him up”, so that he and Jordan could plot with white teams to convince him to drink excessively and perform poorly in front of team boosters. (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake feels “hopeless” and “stuck” in Hush Mouth City after he is kicked off the football team. Petey Da Prince convinces him to “join a gang”, and he almost does until cops bust up the spot. Eventually Blake arrives back in Los Angeles and win the NCAA Championship Game. (See Treatment.)

Spencer feels “hopeless”, and mentally “stuck” after his father Corey dies. He then quits the football team and return to Crenshaw. Coop involves him in "gang-related activities, Spencer even carries a gun. Eventually Spencer arrives back in Beverly Hills. (See  Season 2, Episode 10.)

THEME(S)

Overall, “Blake’s World” is more than boys playing football; it is an expression with a predominantly black cast that talks about problems related to the black community. “Blake’s World” was created in 2013 and was never afraid to start conversations that may be deemed “too controversial” as it’s theme of escapism is premised on a social, political and cultural climate that promotes the scientific advancement of Black Culture based discoveries through programing in Hollywood. (See Executive Summary.) Blake’s life is set forth in a direction for the betterment, add in his compassionate ties, scenes, history, and relationships in the low-class environment makes authentic story telling. (See Treatment.)

Overall, “All American” is more than boys playing football; it is a show with a predominantly black cast that talks about problems related to the black community. “All Americans’” theme of escapism is not afraid to start conversations that may be deemed “too controversial” for television[1]. Spencer’s life is set forth in a direction for the betterment, his reluctancy draws him between both worlds. Coop and Shawn must constantly remind Spencer “he’s from Crenshaw, and not to forget where he’s from”. (See Season 2, Episode 6.)

The Major Theme (creative elements) draws inspiration from Ricketts’ personal life, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (1990) and pure creativity. “Blake’s World is a project I have nurtured since 2012. This marks the 3rd version. It is a controversial piece of content the industry needs right now.

My co-producer, director, production crew, and actors were excited to do this project because it is a topic that’s real and alive, but no one seems to talk about it. In the simplest form of marketing, the most important expectations I have for this project are priceless efforts.

First, I want to send an encrypted message to my nephew, who aspires to be a pro-football player. He lost his mom and dad, and despite the love and support he receives from our family, he is having a hard time understanding what it means to be socially conscious. Who am I to create content that tells my nephew it is ok to fall victim to racism or it’s ok to allow unfair circumstances to distract his tunnel vision?

Secondly, I want to shed light on African-American males, who grow up below poverty level. It is not a circumstance we asked for, yet it’s a circumstance we are born into, so we must fight ten times harder just to prove we can be productive in society. It is not ok for society to criminalize someone because of misunderstanding their personality and background. It was important for us to have moments where the audience says to themselves, “This character makes dumb choices, but we want to keep watching to see if he gets better.” It is a response to ignorance in our politics, Blake’s response, and his support group of friends.

Blake represents not just African American males; he represents everyone who faces almost unbearable obstacles while aiming to succeed. Blake is a character with a high-strong connotation, and I wanted him to be so out of place where people felt like they were watching a REAL/UNPREDICTABLE character who gets better by the obstacle. So my crafting was to forget everything I was trained and trust that my cast mates would add commercial value to the overall production and we did that!

A lot of myself went into this character. I grew up in poverty; my own community cursed me with death or imprisonment by the time I turned 18. The lack of support strengthened me to prove them all wrong. The most sophisticated answer to stereotyping and being falsely accused of anything is simply not to respond and let life play out as it should. Keep a “Tunnel Vision”. (See Copyrighted Biography). Additionally, the “teenage drama” and “sexual identity” was made part of the major theme since 2013. (See Executive Summary; and Chuck.)

The Major Theme (creative elements) draws inspiration from Friday night Lights (2006) and The O.C. (2002). "One of the things that The CW and WB do well is tell the "teen drama" in a multitude of different ways. For starters, I think All American is one of the most inclusive shows on the network across the board, not just in terms of race, but in terms of sexual identity. I also think it's a relatable story in that, even though it's about a young boy from South Central who moves to Beverly Hills, it's relatable for anyone who has a dream and wants to use the talents that they've been given for good. I think it'll help remind people that on a cellular level, we're not really that different, and sometimes we just need to be reminded of that.

Blake’s black fear is failing his family and falling into poverty with a negative mindset – dismantling his opportunity to become a professional football player. (See Presentation Film; Treatment.)

Spencer’s black fear is being seduced back into Crenshaw, and not having a “backup plan” if football does not work out. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1.)

The element of fear constantly shifts through plot points to express “gang banging,” “white supremacy” and/or simply encountering “edgy cops fingering their side arms” to change/amplify the Central Dramatic Question. (see Presentation; Treatment; and Movie Script.)

The element of fear constantly shifts through plot points to express “gang banging,” “white supremacy” and/or simply encountering “edgy cops fingering their side arms” to change/amplify the Central Dramatic Question. (see entire Series.)

The football theme, and special ability is centered on what’s referred to as Blake’s “Tunnel Vision” – Blake’s specifically tailored to the Quarter Back and Runner Back positions, specifically “loosely-tailored” to the  likeness of ex-NFL Player Michael Vick. (See all Copyrights.)

The football theme, and special ability is centered on what’s referred to as Spencer’s “Super Focus” – Spencer’s not tailored towards any football position, therefore, it’s uncertain what’s the concrete expression unless the football theme is merely used to exploit a general “catch all” for football. (See entire Series.)

The racism/poverty theme expressively relates to Blake “bouncing between both worlds” and telling the stories of situations, circumstances, and his relationships to characters belonging to the low class and upper class of society. (See all Copyrights.)

The racism/poverty theme expressively relates to Blake “bouncing between both worlds” and telling the stories of situations, circumstances, and his relationships to characters belonging to the low class and upper class of society. (See Spencer Script; and entire Series.)

Blake’s college major is Public Service and Community Affairs in support of a gentrification theme. (See Executive Summary.) This major was also hinted at throughout the copyrights using “Black History Class,” Blake being a “Math Whiz,” a focus on “Philosophy” and “gentrification” (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

The gentrification theme is expressed when Spencer becomes jealous of his half-brother accumulating attention, so he makes the choice to leave Beverly Hills High and get involved in community activities to “save” Crenshaw High School from becoming a “magnet school”. (See Season 2, Episode 16.)

CHARACTER(S)

Blake Jenkins v. Spencer James

Blake Jenkins is a transcending African American football star, from the hood (“Hush Mouth City”) and this title character was inspired by the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (1990).

The First 10-pages of the Movie Script starts with depicting disadvantages in the lower-class, specifically him and his family are poverty stricken. During his celebrate, on the block, a “couple of guns who were up to no good, started making trouble in the neighbor”.

Blake’s cousin is shot dead, and his brother has Kenny has a bullet lodged 3 millimeters away from his heart. After the “black-on-black crime” incident, Blake wonders what his future would be like if he remained in Hush Mouth City. With self-motivation, and slight inspiration from Tim, Blake makes the tough decision to leave his old world behind and to pursue his dream of becoming a professional football player in the privileged world (“Los Angeles”). Blake then enters a new world, and in comparison, he is a “fish-out-of-water” as his new peers look like trust fund babies. (See Movie Script; Treatment.)

Spencer James is a transcending African American football star, from the hood (“Crenshaw”) and his story is inspired by the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (1990).

The Cold Opening of the Series starts with a football game, and during his touchdown celebration, it mimics The Fresh Prince Lyrics, “chillin’, maxing all cool, shooting outside of the school when a couple of guys who were up to no good, starting making trouble in the neighbor.” As Spencer watches the “black-on-black” crime from afar, he wonders what his future would be like if he remained in the lower-class world. Suddenly, Billy Baker “magically” appears in Crenshaw to illegally recruit Spencer to play for Beverly High. Spencer reluctantly refuses.

Spencer wakes up and realizes that his mother had falling behind on the gas bill and he is “once again” forced to take a cold shower; it’s clear that it’s a reoccurring issue. Spencer then arrives at school in Crenshaw, and “got in one little fight, my mom got scared and said you moving with your auntie and uncle (savior) in Bel-Air”. Spencer’s then “pushed” by Billy Baker, Dillion and Autumn to accept his Call to Destiny. Spencer then enters a new world, and in comparison, the students are wealthy, they have sushi days at school and wear designing clothes/shoes while he is wearing hand me downs. (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake's Hero Journey puts in motion his desire to earn his way out (critical thinking abilities) of the lower class, by way of hard work, dedication, and commitment to “football.” He has embarked on a journey to become a professional football play with the ultimate goal of shedding light on racism and to uplift his family and the community in which he comes from. (See all Copyrights.)

Spencer’s Hero Journey puts in motion an unrealistic plot of being offered a way out (white savior) by a magical Mentor who suddenly pops up in Crenshaw, inducing Spencer into an illegal transfer agreement and with the promise of a “backup plan” in case football doesn’t work out. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1.) Further, to double-back on this propagation, Coop also tells Spencer that the African American athletes in the “urban park” are “stuck” because they did not take their one chance offered a white savior. (See Spencer ScriptSeason 1, Episode 1.)[1]

Blake has a sister, a caring-Grandmother, an older brother, an “absent father”, and an unsupportive auntie with a gambling addiction while most push him to maintain his grades and become a successful football player. (See all Copyrights.)

Spencer has an “absent father”, a little brother and a mother who is falling behind on bills. At first, Spencer was “pushed” to attend Beverly Hills High after being cast out by his rival teammate Asher (Derek). (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake majors in Public Service and Community Affairs. (See Executive Summary.)

After suffering from a gunshot wound, Spencer is no longer able to play football as good as before. Immediately afterwards, he commits to transferring back to Crenshaw in pursuit of a “back up plan”, specifically dedicating himself in community and public affairs to save Crenshaw High from becoming a magnate school. (See Season 2, Episode 16.)

Blake strives to be non-violent, expresses righteous anger through “football,” his academic studies, he is protective of his family, sarcastic and learns to self-identify. (See Treatment (2017).) Blake is made to face each obstacle with little to no help. Blake has ZERO safety nets, no physical mentor, and yet he manages to be non-violent and self-managing. (See all Copyrights.)

Spencer states that he is driven by his anger, he is protective of his family and friends and can be violent at times. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake’s predominately guided by is bliss, an inner-Mentor which is referred to as “Tunnel Vision”. However, he does have physical mentors who vicariously motives to adapt both worlds. (See Movie Script; Treatment.)

Spencer’s predominately guided by physical mentors, which includes a football coach, absent father as well as other family and friends who motives him to adapt both worlds. (See Spencer Script; entire Series.) However, he does have an inner mentor that is referred to as a “Super-Focus”. (See Spencer Script; Advertisement Promos.)

Blake "crosses the gateway" that separates Mouth City from Los Angeles after facing “racism” when Tim motives him to "stick to it," and John tells him that he "can't keep bouncing between both worlds" in place of his opportunity. He also "crosses the gateway" that separates Hush Mouth City from the Los Angeles when Coach Taylor informs him that he believes he has what it takes to win the NCAA Championship game, sparking a “dormant flame". (See Movie Script; Treatment.)

Spencer “crosses the gateway” that separates Crenshaw from Beverly Hills after facing “racism” when Coop motives him to "take the best of both worlds, and boss up". He then arrives at Coach Baker’s house to deliver a monologue, begging for forgiveness to re-join a team he voluntarily quit, stating that he will do whatever it takes to secure a “backup plan” – Coach Baker then tells Spencer he has more potential than everyone else on the team. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake has an “absent father.” Alternatively, Blake’s father is absent on account of leaving his mother, re-marrying, starting a new family with a white woman, and the “absent father” is sought/found by Jazmine in the Special World. Alternatively, Blake’s “absent father” is also a school official, and physical mentor, Professor Henson (See Executive Summary; Blake's World TV Script; and Blake’s World: Professor Henson (2015).) Lastly, and/or alternatively, Blake’s “absent father” is murdered by gang members during a bad drug deal when he was a kid. (See Treatment.)

Spencer’s “absent father” was never Billy Baker (who is married to a white woman) and always Corey James. (See Spencer Script; and Season 1, Episodes 1 and 13.) Corey left Spencer’s mother, moved away, and started a new family when he was a kid. (See Season 1, Episode 2 and 6.) Additionally, Billy Baker also grew up with an “absent father”.

Blake’s intrinsically made to overcome obstacles with little to no help, and his Hero’s Journey (depolarized) is primarily premised on his ability to self-identify. (See Movie Script; Treatment; Presentation Film.)

Spencer dealt with childhood trauma arising from an “absent father” narrative (polarized/over-saturated). However, Spencer’s Hero's Journey is transformed beyond the “absent father” idea when Corey mysteriously dies from cancer. (See Season 2, Episode 7.)

Feeling hopeless, alone, and unprotected, Petey Da Prince convicts Blake to join a gang and partake in drug dealing. However, after cops bust up the spot, Blake decides "not to refuse the call of destiny” and returns to Los Angeles to rejoin the football team. (See Treatment.)

Feeling hopeless, alone, and unprotected, Coop convinces Spencer to become involved with the street life (carrying a gun, gangbanging, drug-dealing, etc.) after Corey died. (See Season 2, Episode 6-10.) Spencer ultimately regains focus more attention on football.

Blake’s brother, Kenny is shot and hospitalized on a gang-related injury. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Spencer is shot and hospitalized on a gang-related act (retaliation for his previous "street life"). (Season 2, Episode 10.)

Blake wins the NCAA Championship game; his family (Joanne and Kenny) are there to watch him win. With his family by his side and making inroads with his team rival (Derek), Blake learns to master Ultra Instinct (“Inner Mentor”) and delivers a speech about learning how to self-identify (conclusively, "Tunnel Vision"). (See Treatment.)

Spencer wins the State Championship game, forgives his mother, brings his family closer, and threatens Beverly High team with returning to Crenshaw High as cognitive/topical cliff-hangers in both the Season 1 and Season 2 finales.

Alex/John v. Jordan Baker

Alex is Blake's wealthy, half-black-half-white best friend. They are teammates with shared moments of jealousy and Alex learns first-hand knowledge of “police brutality,” “black culture” and he represents colorism. (See Colin Kaepernick Script; Short Film Presentation; Movie Script; and Treatment.)

He is Beverly Hills High School's quarterback and Coach Billy Baker's son, whose world is thrown off its axis when Spencer joins the football team and his family. Jordan cannot stand by while Spencer takes his father's attention, especially when that is the one thing he's always trying to get. As time passes, he and Spencer are like brothers. He is in love with Simone, although, she is pregnant with another man's baby. Jordan learns first-hand knowledge of “police brutality”, black culture” by way and through his relationship with Spencer. (See Season 1, Episode 1-3.)

Alex is displeased by Blake’s act of claiming a racial conspiracy against Donald Trump and using the “N-word”, but later Alex admits that he grew up “sheltered”, with maids, never have problems with the cops and did not understand what’s it like to be “black.” (See Short Film Presentation.) Alex's also identify elements of "white supremacy". (See Colin Kaepernick Script.)

Jordan is eager to learn about “black culture”, and his biggest fear is not being “black enough” to make his father proud. He asks Spencer "what it's like to be from Chrenshaw", and then invites himself to Crenshaw. Additionally, Alex is able to connect with his "black side" of family throughout the Series. (See Spencer Script; entire Series.) 

John is secretly instructed by the Coach, and his father (team booster) to take Blake under his wing and show him around Los Angeles. (See Executive Summary; Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Jordan’s secretly instructed by the Coach, his father to take Spencer under his wing and show him around Beverly Hills. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episodes 1-3.)

Alex is a criminal justice major, so he helps Blake and his white female attorney beat the criminal case. (See Movie Script; Treatment.)  Alex states that he's never had an issue with the police and that the cops and district attorney dropped the case, because “they are afraid of a lawsuit.” (See Presentation Short Film.)

Jordan receives a startling wake up call when he and Spencer are harassed by police officers during their ride back to Beverly Hills. Spencer is very cooperative; however, Jordan has never experienced this and chooses to stand up for himself. The cops get more aggressive with Jordan and proceed to slam him on the pavement before handcuffing both he and Spencer. Spencer questions Billy as to why Jordan hasn't been taught how to deal with police officers. Jordan threatens the cops that he will get his white mother who is an attorney. (See All American, Season 1, Episode 2-3.) Laura Baker, Jordan’s mom, and a white female attorney then expresses that true justice is sought by filing a lawsuit.

Alex becomes jealous when Blake receives an endorsement from Marshawn Lynch. Alex then participates in a secret plot with Derek to lace Blake’s drink with LSD to "set him up" and get him suspended. (See Treatment.)

Jordan gets jealous of Spencer because he overheard the coach say that he was a better football player. Jordan then conspires with Asher to "set him up" and squanders his ability to shine in front of important sports boosters. (See Spencer ScriptSeason 1, Episode 1.)

A "secret pregnancy" between Blake and Sabrina,  Blake believes the child may belong to Alex. (See Treatment.)

A "secret pregnancy" between Jordan and Simone, Simone knew the child belonged to someone else. (See Season 2.)

Hush Mouth City Characters v. Tamia Coop

Kenny/Tim/Blake are introduced speaking native slang (understood/found funny by most Black people) to poke fun at “racial stereotypes” while contrasting  life and people in the lower class with predominately white people in the upper class.

Coop is introduced speaking native slang (understood/found funny by most Black people) to poke fun at “racial stereotypes” while contrasting life and people in the lower class with the predominately white people in the upper class.

During the first day of practice, Blake meets Derek, his rival teammate and “white supremacist”. After enduring Derek’s racist behavior and remarks, Blake calls Tim who then reminds him “where he’s from”, encourages him to commit and play by the rules in Los Angeles, and not to “focus on Kenny nor problems” in Hush Mouth City and to “stick with it, because he has a bright future”. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

During the first day of practice, Asher tells Spencer to “Crip walk back to Crenshaw”. After enduring Asher’s racist behavior and remarks, Spencer then quits the Beverly football team, and needs consultation from his Mentors. Coop encourages him to commit and play by the rules in Beverly Hills, telling him to “boss up and take the best of both worlds”, and not to “focus on her nor problems” in Crenshaw. Coop also double-back by telling Spencer that all the talented African Americans in the "urban park" where "stuck" because they didn't take their one opportunity when it was "offered to them". (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake is convinced by Petey Da Prince, a Blood gang-member and his childhood rival to join a gang once he’s not protected by Kenny.  (See Treatment.)

Coop is convinced by Shawn Scoot, a Crip gang-member and Spencer’s childhood rival to join a gang once she is not protected Spencer. (See Season 1, Episode 1-2.)

Petey Da Prince is Blake's childhood rival (kid #1 sporting silver bubble gum wrapping around his teeth) who wants to escape the gang banging lifestyle to become a mainstream rapper. Petey Da Prince, and Blake recollect their childhood memories of playing "football" in the "urban park". Petey Da Prince is a planted character used to express and draw in plot points related to "gang-banging" and "drug-dealing" in the Hush Mouth City world. (See Blake's World TV Script (cold opening); Treatment; and Hush Mouth City Characters.) Blake also makes comedic raps and boasts about having “Tunnel Vision”. (See Presentation Short Film; and Treatment.)

Coop is Spencer's childhood friend who wants to escape the gang banging lifestyle to become a mainstream rapper.  Coop and Spencer recollect their childhood memories of playing "football" in the "urban park". Coop is a planted character used to express and draw in plot points related to "gang-banging" and "drug-dealing" in the Crenshaw world. (See entire Series.) Additionally, Coop also makes a rap song and boasts about being “All American”. (See Season 3, Episode 1.)

Sabrina/Blake/Jazmin v. Layla Keating

Sabrina is the “It Girl” and love interests of Blake who’s initially used by Derek, the racist white antagonist and teammate to test Blake by “setting him up” on false accusations of rape (“hazed”). (See Movie Script.) Derek also uses Blake’s additional friends to “haze him” during a party which resulted in him being suspended 3 games. (See Treatment.)

Layla Keating is the “It Girl” love interests of Spencer who’s initially used by Asher, the then-racist white antagonist to test him by “setting him up” to drink excessively and perform badly in front of team boosters (“hazed.”) (See Spencer ScriptSeason 1, Episode 1.)

Sabrina grew up having an "absent father", and a single mother who decided to take charge of her own life without relying on government assistance. (See Treatment.) The "absent father" element was used to "break the ice" between her and Blake, to be exact they start dating and ultimately have sex after discussing their parents (Sabrina was a college virgin). (See Treatment.)

Leila Keating grew up having a persistently "absent father". (See Spencer Script; entire Series.) Further, the "absent father" element was used to "break the ice" between her and Spencer, to be exact she stole Spencer’s attention from Olivia and they ultimately move-in together and its implied that her Asher and Spencer had a threesome (Leila was NOT virgin). (See Season 1.) Also, Spencer can’t have sex with Layla, because he was distracted by the thought of his “absent father”.

Blake/Jazmin are inherently “loners” as both their father (African American male) and mother were absent. The father left to marry a white women while their mother died in a car accident when they were young.

Layla Keating is inherently a “loner” as both her father (African American male) and mother are absent. The father is a music executive and her mother died in a car accident when she was young.

Sabrina is bullied for dating Blake (who was referred to as a “rapist”), she experiences “racial injustice” by sorority girls, and contemplates suicide to coop with her loneliness/pregnancy. (See Treatment.)

Layla Keating hides secrets from Spencer, contemplates suicide, and/or drug usage to deal with her “loneliness.” (See entire Series.)

Joanne/Grandmother v. Grace James

Joanne cannot afford funeral expenses for Rodney (life insurance policy), nor could she help cover the cost of Kenny’s hospital bill(s). (See Movie Script.)

During a hospital visit, a nurse talks about the mistreatment of blacks in healthcare. It is common that African Americans do not get the same urgency or support in healthcare that their white counterparts get. (See Season 2, Episode 11.)

Blake’s aunt Joanne (a single black women) is behind in bills and has a gambling addiction. In comparison to Blake’s “at home” struggles, the kids in Los Angeles look like trust fund babies. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Spencer’s mother Autumn (a single black women) is behind in bills, she works for the LAPD and makes up a catchy phrase to supplement her lack of financial support and Spencer having to take a cold shower. Additionally, Spencer could not afford a laptop nor a suit for a sport’s booster event. (See Spencer Script; and Season 1, Episode 1.)

Hush Mouth City Characters v. Shawn Scott/Crenshaw

Petey Da Prince - a gang banging drug dealer, and Blake’s childhood rival. (See Blake’s World TV Script; Treatment; Hush Mouth City Characters.)

Shawn Scoot - a gang-banging drug dealer, and Spencer’s childhood rival. (See Spencer Script; Season 1, Episode 1 and 8.)

Petey Da Prince convinces Blake to join a gang once he is no longer protected by Kenny. (See Treatment.)

Shawn Scoot convinces Coop to join a gang once she is no longer protected by Spencer. (See Season 1, Episode 1-2.)

Blake finds comfort in Hush Mouth City when he and Petey Da Prince have a conversation about playing football in the “urban park” as kids.

Spencer finds comfort in Los Angeles when he and Coop have a conversation about playing football in the “urban park” as kids.

Derek/John/Chuck v. Asher Adams

Derek is a student and starring QB at a fictious D1 University. Feeling threatened by Blake’s role on the team, Derek models the conception of white supremacy by constantly plotting to get rid of Blake, which included acts of blackmail, having his love interest, friends and predominately white teammates sabotage him on the field and in the Los Angeles world. After taking steroids, Derek is ousted by his teammates- helps Blake win the NCAA Championship and they ultimately becomes friends.  (See Blake’s World TV Script; Presentation Film; Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Asher Adams is a student at Beverly Hills High School -- currently dealing with steroid addiction. Beverly High’s wide receiver. Feeling threatened by Spencer’s role on the team, Asher was almost successful in getting rid of Spencer from the team. After a good look at what his life had turned into, Asher worked hard to get back on the right path – with the team and his friends.

Blake and John are roommates, and there is an “unspoken” sexual climate/righteous anger (marketing purposes). (See Executive Summary; Blake’s World TV Script; Movie Script; Presentation Short Film; and Treatment.)

Asher moves in with Layla Keating and Spencer, and there’s an “unspoken” sexual climate/righteous anger (marketing purposed). (See Season 1, Episode 4-5.)

Derek instructs his white teammate, Tim Turner, #57 to sabotage Blake during an important game – but Blake wins the game despite disadvantages by his own teammate(s). (See Treatment.)

Asher hands over Beverly Hill’s playbook to a rival team in order to sabotage Spencer during an important game – but Spencer wins the game despite Asher’s betrayal. (See Season 1, Episode 4.)

John was raised in a low-income family. His Father attended LPU he got lucky and won $38 million in the Mega lottery – donating millions to the football team. Prior to winning the lottery, John was forced to cope with his mother and father’s absence in this life as a result of alcohol and drug abuse. (See Executive Summary.)

Asher comes from a poor background, his mother was a “hooker” he’s some-what homeless, because his dad “gambled away” the families’ money now rents in Beverly Hills. Asher’s father is also an alcoholic and drug user who acts like a team booster. (See Spencer Script; and Season 1, Episode 1-5, 11.)

Chucks’ father forced him to play football his entire life, and he ultimately commits suicide due to suffering from concussions and instead of facing his father/fear. (See Treatment; and Chuck.)

Asher’s father disowned him once he is kicked off the football team. (See Season 2, Episodes 4, 8, 15-16.)

Other Characters

Professor Henderson is Blake’s History Teacher. Him and black engage in underlying power struggles. Turns out, he is the “absent father” who left Blake and Jazmin before their mom died in a car accident. (See Blake’s World TV Script (cold opening).) Professor Henderson moved from Hush Mouth City to Los Angeles and is now married to a white-women with bi-racial kids. (See Executive Summary; Blake’s World TV Script; Professor Henderson.)

Coach Tim Taylor is friends with John’s father, who so happens to be a sport’s booster. (See Executive Summary.) Coach Tim Taylor has secretly instructed John to take Blake under his wing.

Coach Tim Taylor desperately needs Blake to win the NCAA Championship game because his job is on the line. Coach Tim Taylor ignites a “dormant flame” within Blake, winning the State Championship game and igniting the topical discussion of character building and overcoming unbearable obstacles. (See Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Billy Baker is the head coach of Beverly who strives to replicate his glory days as an ex-NFL Player into the likes of Spencer. Billy Baker is from Crenshaw, but now lives in Beverly Hills with a white wife and biracial kids. He was introduced by suddenly arriving in Crenshaw to illegally recruit Spencer to play for Beverly. His wife is a successful attorney, and they share two biracial teenagers. Billy Baker secretly instructs Jordan to take Spencer under his wing.

Billy Baker desperately needs Spencer to win the Championship game because his job ins on the line. He also has a previous relationship with Spencer’s mom – maybe he’s Spencer father – he’s the Mentor for Spencer in support of Spencers’ dream of stardom, winning the State Championship game, and to ignite topical discussion of race. (See Season 1, Episode 3; and entire Series.)

After being falsely accused of a crime, Blake is then taken to a dark alley where racist cops beat him and threaten to kill him. (See Treatment.) With the help of Alex, Blake is then saved by a successful white female attorney. (See Treatment; and Movie Script.) Alex states, “the cops dropped the case because they are afraid of a lawsuit”. (See Presentation Short Film.)

After being pulled over by edgy cops with trigger fingers, Spencer and Jordan are harassed/nearly assaulted. With the help of Jordan’s mom, a successful white female attorney who becomes the District Attorney – the cops are threatened with a lawsuit – and in turn somewhat-apologizes for their conduct. (See Season 1, Episode 3.)

Blood/Crip Gang Bangers and drug dealers who works out of Barbershops and in the “urban park”. (See Treatment; Movie Script; Hush Mouth City.) Terrance, a gang leader in Hush Mouth City. He was threatened by Petey Da Prince to “check in” with his cousin, Delray, another leader from the same gang. Delray then attempts to rob Terrance who then lies and tell Delray that there’s gang members waiting outside of his mother’s house and they’d kill her if he didn’t return. Terrance also makes Delray and his girlfriend give him $10,000.00 to “settle the beef”. In retaliation, Derek shoots up Terraces’ car, striking his younger brother and in turn Terrance gets the ultimate revenge by killing Delray.

Blood/Crip Gang Bangers and drug dealers who works out of Barbershops and in the “urban park”. (See Entire Series.) Tyrone Moore, a gang leader in Crenshaw. He was the mastermind that killed both Brendon and Shawn Scott. He also put Preach into hospital by shooting. He was apprehended by Police on State Championship night after Coop set up a police ambush. However, he was released from jail after Preach decided not to testify. He was later killed in his front porch by Ruth Scott in revenge for killing her sons.

Blake’s grandmother and Jazmin resent their “absent father” because he left their family, moved away, and remarried a white woman. (See Blakes’ World TV Script (cold opening); Professor Henderson.)

Blake’s grandmother attempts to “casted the devil out” when John visits his family in Hush Mouth City and they walk around her house half-naked (LBGT element) during a spring break trip to Florida. (See Professor Henderson.)

After seeing acts of white supremacy, Blake has difficulty showing intimacy to his white girlfriend Sarah, because her parents are racist and will never accept him. (See Colin Kaepernick Script.)

Chucks’ father “disowns” him for being gay, thereby forcing him to play football to appear more masculine than he truly is. (See Chuck.)

Janelle Cooper, Coop's overly religious, divorced, homophobic mother who throws Coop out of her house after she comes out as a lesbian.

Willy Baker. Billy abandoned him after going pro and left Crenshaw. He disapproves of his son's lifestyle and refuses to accept his daughter-in-law because she is white.

Harold Adam doesn't care about Asher. Football is the only reason Harold wants to be in Asher's life and he makes that apparent when he kicks him out and tells him to "figure it out" with his mother (an ex-Hooker).

The Lisa/Loren character is the social pariah with an alcohol addiction, who is dead set on rebelling against her parents. She gets heavily intoxicated, flaunts herself onto “jocks", and ends up having sex with Andrew, the lovable loser. (See Executive Summary; and Blake’s World TV Script.)

Olivia Baker is a bisexual social pariah with a drug addiction, whose rebellion seems to arise from her anger towards her parents. She spent some time in rehab and flaunts herself onto men and women for validation. Ends up having lesbian sex. (See Spencer Script; and Entire Series.)

Blake’s World was created for and to inspire the young-African American boy. (See Biography.) Additionally, Terraces’ brother Keyshawn is an all-star lineman who keeps his nose clean and refused to accept “drug money” from Terrance as their mom instructed. Keyshawn’s the average teenager who stay home to play video games instead of running the streets.

Spencer’s goal is to set a positive example for Dillion, his younger brother. (See Spencer Script; and the Entire Series.) Dillion James (season 2; recurring season 1) Spencer's younger brother. Like Spencer, he is also an A-grade student, and is much more mature for his young age. Likes sci-fi comics. He wants to play American football like his brother Spencer, but he is too young.

Football characters in support of Fraternity Lifestyle, underage drinking and excessive partying. (See Executive Summary; and Blake’s World TV Script)

JJ Parker, an outside linebacker/tight end for the Beverly High Eagles. A party boy that likes to organize parties.

“Black Lives Matter” and any “hot news” surrounding the topical discussion as a “concrete element”. (See Executive Summary.)

Kia Williams, South Crenshaw High student, ex-girlfriend of Spencer and an avid social activist. Her uncle is a reformed Bloods gang member. Flip, Kia's uncle and a reformed Blood gang member.

Coach Taylor (Movie Script), coach for the D1 program in which Blake attends. Walked Blake’s Scouts.com football tape and invites him on a “free pass” to try out for his team. Has strong faith in Blake, so he concocts a plan with John to assure that Blake will shine during the Spring Conditioning Game.

Coach Wilson (season 2), coach for UCLA football team who wants Spencer and Darnell to play for them in college.

Blake raps as a hobby. (See Presentation Short Film; and Treatment.) Petey Da Prince raps with professional intents. (See Treatment.) Also, Edgar came from Cuba to America to make it as a musician. (See Executive Summary.)

Coop’s a rapper.

Chynna, Layla's father's new lover, but also a rapper managed by JP that is set to make her debut.

Patience, Coop's love interest is an aspiring lyricist.

SETTING(S)

Modern day, dueling-and-contrasting settings in Crenshaw (“Ordinary World” and/or “Lower-class”) and Beverly Hills (“Special World” and/or “Upper-class”). Meaningful scenes premised on race, white supremacy, racial injustice, social class, gentrification, and football as part of its concrete setting(s). (See all Copyrights.)

Modern day, dueling-and-contrasting settings in Crenshaw (“Ordinary World” and/or “Lower-class”) and Beverly Hills (“Special World” and/or “Upper-class”). Meaningful scenes premised on race, white supremacy, racial injustice, social class, gentrification, and football as part of its concrete setting(s). (See Entire Series.)

Modern day college setting and filmed at the University of Southern California with attractive scenery of Los Angeles, Beaches, Mountain(s), wealthy people/places, hot chicks etc. (See all Copyrights.)

Modern day high school setting and filmed at the University of Southern California with scenery of Los Angeles, Beaches, Mountain(s), wealthy people/places, hot chicks etc. (See Entire Series.)

Modern day setting full of gang bangers – filmed in a poor neighbor - with reoccurring scenes of Blake’s family, football, barber shop, trap house, and an urban park. (See Treatment; Movie Script; and Hush Mouth City.)

Modern day setting full of gang bangers - filmed in a poor neighbor - with reoccurring scenes of Spencer’s family, football, barber shop, trap house and an urban park. (See Treatment; Movie Script; and Hush Mouth City.)

MOOD(S)

By and through Blake, and football the audience falls into a broad mood of escapism and suspense. The Alpha Brain triggers one’s mood and ability to identify with Blake, a coming-of-age boy who is navigating two separate worlds. (See all Copyrights.)

By and through Spencer, and football the audience falls into a broad mood of escapism and suspense. The Alpha Brain triggers one’s mood to engage in teenage drama, and Spencer, a coming-of-age boy who’s navigating two separate worlds. (See Spencer Script; and Entire Series.)

The general mood is a coming-of-age drama (with a sense of humor), empathic, empowering, and subconsciously forces white-America (18-34 demographic) to address their own input of racism narratives whilst exposing what African American males endure on a daily basis as Blake dreams of stardom. (See all Copyrights.)

The general mood is teenage drama, empathic, empowering, and subconsciously “consumes” African Americans by and through Spencer.

PACE(S)

Intended for a young audience. Starts in Hush Mouth City with a handful of side plots to expose Blake’s talent, black on black crime, gentrification, poverty, the thoughts, mindset, lack of opportunity and trouble in the low class. There afterwards, Blake sets to earn his way into a new world of wealth, opportunity and has to face obstacles almost exclusively based on his skin color while playing football in a predominately white world – all happening within the first 10-pages of the Movie Script and descried as the Inciting Incident in the Treatment.

Intended for a young audience. Starts in Crenshaw with a handful of side plots to expose Spencer’s talent, black on black crime, poverty, the thoughts, mindset, lack of opportunity and trouble in the low class. There afterwards, Spencer is invited enters a new world of wealth, opportunity and has to face obstacles almost exclusively based on his skin color while playing football in a predominately white world – all happening within ACT ONE of the Spencer Script and the Pilot Episode.

Blake faces racism from his white teammates, specifically Derek who happens to be threatened by Blake (they play the same position). Blake meets his allies and is then tested by Derek, who sends Sabrina “set him up” – and have other teammates to sabotage Blake on the field during an important game - all happening within the first 30-pages of the Movie Script and described as the Plot #1 and Pinch #1 in the Treatment.

Spencer faces racism from his white teammates, specifically Asher and they happen to play the same position. Spencer meets his allies is then tested by Asher, who sends his girlfriend Leila Keating to “set him up” – and have other teammates abet Spencer into excessive drinking so that he’d perform badly in front of sports boosters.  – all happening within ACT TWO of the Spencer Script and the Pilot Episode.

DIALOG

Motivational dialog delivered to and from Blake (broadly construed) is primarily premised on achieving a superior drive and mindset to master football/life, overcoming racism, fear and figuring out how to succeed in life while navigating both worlds set forth as his Tunnel Vision (“Special Ability”). Blakes’ Special Ability is referenced as “untapped energy” or a “dormant flame” while being able to see life and the football field in a way life no one else can. Blake ultimately masters his Special Ability by winning the Championship game, then delivers a speech premised on race and social injustice/reform and how to access the Special Ability to achieve success in life. (See Treatment; and Biography.)

Motivational dialog delivered to and from Spencer (broadly construed) is primarily premised on achieving a superior drive and mindset to master football/life, overcoming racism, fear and figuring out how to succeed in life while navigating both worlds set forth as his Super Focus (“Special Ability”). Spencers’ Special Ability is referenced as a “keen eye” and first referenced when he clocks a clumsy guy and uses it to charm Leila Keating in the Pilot Espisode. Spencer’s constantly reminded of his Special Ability by Coop and Billy Baker. Spencer wins the State Championship game.  (See Season 1, Episode 16.) Spence also delivers a speech premised on his advocacy for social injustice/reform and saving Crenshaw High from becoming a magnet school. (See Season 2, Episode 16.)

During the first game, Blake, yells “57’s the Mic” to alert Chuck (center) as to which defensive player was going to blitz and to block so that he could make the play. Blake makes the play by throwing a touchdown pass to John, the wide receiver. (See Movie Script.)

During the first game, the Crenshaw QB yells “57’s the Mic” to alert his teammate (center) as to which defensive player was going to blitz and to block so that he could make the play. The QB makes the play by throwing a touchdown pass to Spencer, then-wide receiver. (See Season 1, Episode 1 (cold opening).)

Black people dialog starts off by poking fun of racial stereotypes, specifically Blake’s family/friend stating that he “should’ve attended an HBU, somewhere he’s celebrated and not just tolerated”, “Southern Cal ain’t exactly teeming with James Baldwinities” and to the likes of “bougie people”. There afterwards, the reoccurring Black people dialog (spoken and unspoken) is broadly premised on racism, gang-slang, social injustice and “Black Lives Matter” advocacy – as expressed in the Business Plan created in 2013; Treatment; Movie Script; and Hush Mouth City.)

Black people dialog starts off by poking fun of racial stereotypes, specifically Spencers’ friend Coop states that people in Beverly Hills eats “mayonnaise sandwiches” and that the girls are “too skinny”. There afterwards, the reoccurring Black people dialog (spoken and unspoken) is broadly premised on racism, gang-slang, social injustice and “Black Lives Matter” advocacy. (See Season 1, Episodes 1, 3; Season 2, Episode 1.)

After facing racism at the hands of Derek and other white teammates, Blake makes a call to Tim and tells him that he does not know if he will survive in the white world. Tim says, “remember why you are doing this. Keep a Tunnel Vision”, and “Don’t let this shit get you down, man. You got a future. Life will sort itself out.” (See Movie Script.) John (white character) also tells Blake that if he wants to be successful, “You can’t keep bouncing between both worlds.” (See Movie Script.)

After facing racism at the hands of Asher and other teammates, Spencer travels back to Crenshaw and tells Coop that he "plays on a team full of guys who do not like him" (because of his skin color and socioeconomic background). After highlighting that the other talented African Americans in the "urban park" were "stuck" for not taking their own chance offered to them... Coop says, “You only get one chance, take the best of both worlds and man up”. (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Sabrina tells Blake that “everyone was looking at him, because he’s the money tree” because he won over the packed stadium, which lead to Derek sending Sabrina to “set him up”. (See Movie Script; Treatment (Melanie character); Shortfilm Presentation (Melanie character.) However, ultimately Sabrina starts dating Blake. (See Treatment.)

Layla tells Spencer “Hey aren’t you some crazy good football player”. Leila Keating meant that the other football players were scared because Spencer was a good football player and to conspire with Asher by inviting Spencer to a party to “set him up”. However, ultimately, she dumps Asher and starts dating Spencer. (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Blake and Sabrina’s dialog are broadly sweet, loveable and some-what goofy. The two “break the ice” when Blake gets the courage to approach her. After having a conversation about their parents, they began dating. They share a dialog that ultimately leads to a rocky relationship when Blake becomes egotistic, has sex with a white girl, and is accused of rape so Sabrina contemplates suicide to deal with her loneliness. (See Presentation Film; Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Spencer and Leila Keating’s dialog is broadly sweet, loveable and some-what goofy. The two “break the ice” when Leila steals Spencer away from Olivia when she “breaks the ice” by mentioning her dead mother and absent father. They share a dialog that ultimately leads to an entanglement, Spencer moving in, the two breaking up, Leila Keating keeping secrets from Spencer and she then contemplates suicide. (See Entire Series.)

Sequence of Events/Selection and Arrangement

Ends with a God-shot of Los Angeles before Alex stated that Blake needs to prepare for the up-coming football game. (See Presentation Short Film.)

Starts with a God-shot of Los Angeles and transitions to a football game. (See Season 1, Episode 1.)

Flashback: Blake’s an 11 year old kid, playing football in the “urban park” with young-Petey Da Prince. He has a sister; both being raised by their grandmother. Their mother died in a car accident and he has an “absent father”. (See Blake’s World TV Script (cold opening).)

Flashback: Spencers’ a young-kid, playing football in the neighborhood park. His mother is there to cheer him on, but he is disappointed because of an “absent father”. (See Season 1, Episode 2 (cold opening).)

Blake, the transcending African American football star, from the “hood” starts his journey in Hush Mouth City to set-up a significant amount of plots premised on the selection and arrangement of popular black culture, and major plots like gang-banging, poverty, black-on-black crime, and black people dialog before he transitions to Los Angeles to set up an equal amount of major plots premised on wealth v. poverty, racism, and football as a business model to “blend both worlds” – the story being told through Blakes’ eyes. (See Business Plan.)

Spencer, the transcending African American football star, from the “hood” starts his journey in Crenshaw to set-up a significant amount of plots premised on the selection and arrangement of popular black culture, and major plots like gang-banging, poverty, black-on-black crime, and black people dialog before he transitions to Beverly Hills to set up an equal amount of major plots premised on wealth v. poverty, racism, and football as a business model to “blend both worlds” - the story being told through Spencers’ eyes. (See Entire Series.)

Alex, the biracial best friend and teammate who grew up privileged is a subliminal take on the idea of colorism. In fact, Alex grew up with “maids/money” and “sheltered”. He learns of black culture and racial injustices by and through his relationship with Blake. In contrast, Blake suffers inequities because he is dark skinned and comes from a poor background. (See Presentation Short Film; Colin Kaepernick Script; Movie Script; and Treatment.)

Jordan, the biracial best friend and teammate who grew up privileged is a subliminal take on the idea of colorism. In fact, Jordan grew up “sheltered” and has no clue “what’s it like to be from Crenshaw”. He invites himself to Crenshaw, and learns of black culture and racial injustices by and through his relationship with Spencer. In contrast, Spencer suffers inequities because he is dark skinned and comes from a poor background. (See Season 1, Episodes 1-3.)

Lisa, the social pariah - Emo Kid, Andrew, Chris, Chuck as well as an implied (unspoken) sexual climate between Blake and John is in support of the LBGT community. (See Business Plan.)

Olivia, the social pariah- Coop and all lesbian characters is in support of the LBGT community. (See Entire Series.)

Central plot point of “unlawful killing of black men and the cause/effect of Colin Kaepernick’s act of kneeling during the National Anthem”. (See Colin Kaepernick Script.)

All American offers a lot of opportunity to dive into topical storytelling, from tales of race and class, to the divide over athletes taking a knee during the national anthem, getting special treatment and locker room culture. “We’re trying not to be too preachy out of the gate, but yes [we’re dealing in those things],” showrunner April Blair tells Variety.

I declare under the penalties or perjury in the State of California that the foregoing is true, correct and made to the best of my acknowledgement. As to those things stated upon information and belief, I believe them to be true as well. This Website was executed on December 5th, 2020, in San Diego, California.

By: Donat Ricketts

CW'S 'ALL AMERICAN' [STOLEN] BY WHITE EXECUTIVES FROM A BLACK AMERICAN

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